Fluorescent minerals usually look like any other rocks until you look at them under ultraviolet light. Then they glow with bright and beautiful colors. Some of the best specimens have several colors all in one piece. They're fairly easy to find out in the field. Here's a few stories and pictures to illustrate that fact. More will be added.

New Discovery UV Galleries

NEW: Fluorescent Mineral Large Poster Gallery

 

New:  Fluorescent Minerals of the Southern African Display Case

My Geo-Safari research project

 

Arizona

 

 Collecting trips to the 3-Color Mine and Bluebird Mine, Arizona, 1992
 
 
The Fourth of July weekend, 1993 expedition to Castle Dome and Purple Cow Ledge, Arizona

 

 San Benito Wilds - collecting at night in the Diablo Range, central California
 

 

 

Fluorescent Ontario, the collecting trip of a lifetime, Canada, 1993

 

Side trip to Ogdensburg, New Jersey

 

 

 

Fluorescent mineral collecting at the Illimaussaq Complex, Narsaq, Greenland

 

 

 Tom Warren field trip, Arizona, 1994
 Capturing my fluorescent minerals on film

 

Fluorescent mineral stereo pairs

 

 

 

I am proud to have been the founding father of the Northern California Region of the Fluorescent Mineral Society. I was appointed as a Regional Vice-President of the FMS, serving from 1992 to 1998 when I moved to Southern California.

I live in Southern California working for the Mars Exploration Program at the NASA Jet Propulsion Lab. In 2006 I became a Board Member at Large of the Fluorescent Mineral Society and attend the monthly meetings in Pasadena.

 

Northern California Region, FMS scrapbook

Fluorescent Mineral Society showcase of some of my collection

 

Warning: Collecting fluorescent minerals at night or in mines can be hazardous!

About the images: all the fluorescent minerals on these pages were photographed by astronomer-inventor-artist David Mark of San Francisco, with only two exceptions (see below). Dave used his own custom-built 3D camera to shoot stereo 3D slides.

Most of the minerals shown here are mine except for some specimens in the group shots that belong to my Fluorescent Mineral Society friends. I am also indebted to the late Eric DeVroeg for two invaluable images - zunyite and fluoborite.

And special thanks to my geologist friend George Polman because if it wasn't for him I would probably never have been able to go on some of the best collecting adventures. George is a world-class collector and dealer of fluorescent minerals who lives in Phoenix, Arizona.

 

   Find Greenland fluorescent minerals at Minershop.com

I was on the Geo Adventure 2004 trip to Greenland.

Here is my "Trip Report"

 

Visit the Thomas S. Warren Museum of Fluorescence in New Jersey

Museum website

 

    Fluorescent mineral collector contact: Corby Waste